Wednesday, August 27, 2014

SEARCHING HIGH SCHOOL KIDS FOR WEAPONS...WHAT THIS REALLY MEANS



Bugandi student shot by police
For years, we’ve heard the rhetoric about the need for  good parenting  and how a good  families  are  the building blocks to  a  good society.    
        This morning,  it hit me  how  we,  as nation,  have allowed our country  to  slip towards  - what I would call -  a crisis point  in our history.
       This morning, I saw  students at the Lae Secondary School having their bags  searched for weapons and other contraband.           While much of the blame have been leveled at the bad influences from student groups,  an equal portion of blame – perhaps more-  should be shared by parents.   Every parent should also ask  themselves several important questions;
           “How much of a positive influence do I have in my child’s life?” 
 “Do I know his friends and where he hangs out after school?” 
“Why is my son or daughter  arriving home at 6.30pm?”
“Why is he spending a lot of time alone with his mobile phone and who is he conversing with?”
Why  have we reached a point in our country’s history  where  secondary school kids  have to undergo bag searches  by security guards?   From 2012 to 2014,  I’ve   covered numerous school fights, one stabbing death, two police shootings of students involved in school fights.
           I’ve witnessed  how  teachers,  including  senior members of the schools,  have become so afraid  of their own students because of the potential physical harm that their  students may cause to them and their families.  Why have  people in positions of authority  become so afraid of exerting  authority?
I hear this a lot: “Let the authorities  deal with the problem.”   But me break  this down into its most simplest  form. 
1.                   The first authority that the child is supposed to recognize  and submit to is the authority of a mother,  a father,  uncles and aunts.   If that authority isn’t respected,  how can we expect that  the rules of this great nation of ours to be followed?

2.    A child is, first and foremost,  the responsibility of  a father and mother.  If left unguided and uncared for,  he or she evolves into a problem  for the government of Papua New Guinea.
Unfortunately,  Papua New Guinea’s justice system  sees things in black and white and has no patience, flexibility nor tolerance for  rogues  who were once children.

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